How to Send Money to Other Banks Using a Japan Post Bank ATM (With Pictures)

Japan Post Bank, known as “Yucho Ginko” in Japanese, is well known amongst the foreign community in Japan for being easy to open an account with. Withdrawing money is also a breeze, with compatible ATMs in post offices and convenience stores dotted all across the country. These ATMs can be used in English and several other languages, making them the preferred banking service for many of Japan’s international residents. To help make banking in Japan even easier, this article will demonstrate (with pictures) how to use a Japan Post Bank ATM to send money to a different bank account.

Japan Post Bank: One of the Easiest Banks For Foreigners in Japan

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Japan Post Bank is said to be one of the easiest banks for foreign residents in Japan to use and set up an account with. As long as you present a residence card (在留カード) with a 3 month minimum period of stay along with other necessary documents, such as student or employee IDs, you should have no trouble opening an account. If you don’t have a hanko stamp, then a signature will do just fine, and if you’re not confident with Japanese, then you can freely use one of the multi-language translation tablets at the counter.

They have an online website where you can check what documents are required to open a bank account with them and prepare them all in advance. You can also apply for a savings account through the website as long as you don’t need a bankbook, making the entire process even more convenient! The convenience also extends to the availability of Japan Post Bank facilities and services. They are available in most post offices across Japan, and withdrawals and deposits can be freely made via ATMs from all other Japanese banks, including Seven Bank and MUFG.

However, if you want to send money from an overseas bank account into your Japan Post Bank account, be aware that you’ll need to use a designated intermediary bank and use U.S. dollars or Euros. Furthermore, remittance may not be possible depending on factors like the bank itself or the remittance details. To avoid situations where you’re unable to receive or send money to and from your home country, make sure to carefully confirm the stipulations before setting up an account.

▼Related Article: A Guide to Japanese Banking for Foreigners, From Opening to Closing an Account

Below, we’ll demonstrate how to send money using Japan Post Bank to another Japan Post Bank account or to an account from a different bank. Whether you’re paying rent or just making a purchase, we’ll take you through every step of the way with accompanying ATM screen images to ensure you have no trouble organizing your finances in Japan!

How to Send Money From Your Japan Post Bank Account to Another Japan Post Bank Account 

If both you and the recipient have Japan Post Bank accounts, you can instantly transfer money to them from your savings. This can be done at a nearby Japan Post Bank, post office banking counter, ATM, or via Yucho Direct or Yucho Biz Direct. When proceeding with the transfer, you’ll need to specify the recipient’s transfer or savings account code/number (記号/番号).

If you’re using an ATM, the maximum amount will be set to 500,000 yen unless you’ve changed it. If you wish to transfer a greater amount, you’ll need to change your preferences in advance. This can be done at the counter of a Japan Post Bank or post office banking counter after presenting your ID and cash card/bankbook/registered seal.

For each remittance, an additional fee of 146 yen at the counter and 100 yen at an ATM, Yucho Direct, or Yucho Biz Direct will be charged. Using Yucho Biz Direct will also require a sign-up fee or monthly payment (free until March 31, 2022).

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How to Send Money From Your Japan Post Bank Account to a Different Bank

You can send money from your Japan Post Bank Account to an account registered with a different bank at a nearby Japan Post Bank/post office banking counter (transfer fee: less than 50,000 yen = 660 yen, 50,000 yen or more = 880 yen) or at an ATM, Yucho Direct, or Yucho Biz Direct (transfer fee: less than 50,000 yen = 220 yen, 50,000 yen or more = 440 yen). Same as above, if you haven’t changed the withdrawal/transfer limit, the ATM will be set to a maximum of 500,000 yen.

Furthermore, if you’re sending money overseas, there will be a transfer fee of 3,000 yen with Yucho Direct or 7,500 yen at the counter.

1:First, select ご送金 (remittance) from the menu

2:Next, select 他行口座へのご送金 (remittance to another bank)

3:Next will appear a warning for transfer fraud. Simply touch 次へ to go to the next screen.

4:Insert your card or bankbook

5:Enter your PIN

6:Select the name of the recipient’s financial institution or type of institution (local bank, trust bank, etc.)

7:Enter the first character (katakana) of the receiving bank branch (if you want to use the alphabet, select 英字)

8:Select the receiving bank branch

9:Select the account type from 普通預金 (ordinary), 当座預金 (checking), or 貯蓄預金 (saving)

10:Enter the account number of the receiving account

11:Enter the remittance amount and choose 円 (yen)

12:You’ll then be prompted to confirm the remittance amount. If it is correct, touch 確認. If you’ve made a mistake and would like to re-enter it, touch 訂正 (amend).

13:Confirm the remittance fee and transfer fee. If correct, touch 確認. If incorrect, touch 取消 (cancel).

14:Enter the name that will be displayed to the recipient. If the name on your cash card/bankbook is fine, then you can press はい (yes) without entering anything. If you’d like to change the remitter name or add a number before the name, select いいえ (no).

15:Insert a phone number that you can answer during the day

How to Send Money With Cash to a Japan Post Bank Account

You can send money via cash to a Japan Post Bank account at a Japan Post Bank or post office banking counter. This can be done even if you don’t possess a Japan Post Bank account yourself.

To do this, head to a Japan Post Bank or post office banking counter and provide the recipient’s transfer account code/number and pay the remittance amount along with the appointed fee.*

*Appointed Fees:
Bank Counter
Less than 50,000 yen: 203 yen
50,000 yen or more: 417 yen
ATM
Less than 50,000 yen: 152 yen
50,000 yen or more: 366 yen

Reference Pages:
▼Japan Post Bank/ATM Search Page (Japanese)
https://www.jp-bank.japanpost.jp/kojin/access/kj_acs_index.html
▼Japan Post Bank ATM Finder App (English)
https://www.jp-bank.japanpost.jp/en/ias/en_ias_app.html

While setting up a life in Japan has its fair share of challenges, easy-to-use, foreigner-friendly services like Japan Post Bank make it a lot easier. Next time you need to send money, use this article as a guide and make banking in Japan manageable and stress-free!

If you want to give feedback on any of our articles, you have an idea that you’d really like to see come to life, or you just have a question on Japan, hit us up on our Facebook!

By the way, if you're looking for a job or career change and you're already in Japan, we now have a jobs site called tsunagu Local Jobs! On top of having exclusive job listings that you won't find anywhere else, we've vetted all the listings to ensure that they're foreigner-friendly and high quality. If you register for an account on the site, you can even make use of our agent service where our international staff will help you find the perfect job in Japan, so check it out today!

The information in this article is accurate at the time of publication.

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